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What are good blog topics to attract buyers?

Craft Boutique


Posts: 177


« on: January 09, 2010, 02:12:10 am »

I was thinking of what I'd want to write about in my next blog post and then I paused, and thought about who I am actually writing it for.
I know other crafters are reading blog posts here, as I see their comments, but what about buyers? If Iíd like to attract potential buyers to my blog and, ultimately, to my store, what should I write about? I wonder if others thought about this. The only thing I came up with Ė free tutorials and tips on knitting. Any thoughts and ideas are greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Fairy Cardmaker


Posts: 1112


« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2010, 09:12:21 pm »

That's what gets me to go to blogs: tips and tutorials #1.  Free anything is big too.  Try to think of "free" as "getting your foot in the door" instead of giving your shirt away.

I don't have many comments on my own blog either, so I'd like to see others' answers too.
Northern Girl Jewelry


Posts: 199


« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2010, 07:17:26 pm »

This is something I have thought about a lot.  I often see blogs written by crafters and artisans and wonder who they are targeting as an audience, because I think they intend buyers, but write for others in their craft.  Congrats to you for having taken the time to think about who you want your audience to be.

I'll answer this one from the perspective of a non-knitter.  Yes, back in school I learnt how, but I don't like to do it, so now that I don't have to, I don't.  Smiley  Because I don't knit, if I want knitted items, I buy them.  Think mitts for myself, hats for babies of friends, etc.  So think of me as a potential buyer for your products.  

Because I don't knit, tutorials about knitting are not something that I would look for.  If I accidentally found one, I wouldn't bother to read it, I'd move on to something else.  

I'm more likely to respond to photos of your products.  You can tell me some basic stuff about the materials you use (I'm interested in to know if it's wool, cotton, acrylic, etc.) and how to care for it.  Maybe even tell me that x material is great for y application (so that I don't buy socks made from yarn that is really intended for something really delicate, just because I know nothing about yarns).  If there is something special about some of the yarns you use - they are organic, or hand-dyed, or hypo-allergenic, or you raise your sheep yourself and hand spin your yarn, etc. - then tell me about it.  It makes the material special.  Maybe talk to me about how you make your products, how long it takes, show pictures of you at work on something, talk about your inspiration, etc.

My point really is that you are an expert at what you do, but likely your customers and potential customers are not.  We don't know what you know and we don't do what you do.  So don't talk to us as though we are knitters, but talk to us as folks who don't know anything about it (and possibly aren't interested in becoming knitters either).  

I don't say this to sound harsh.  It's just that in my day job, I've spent years working in the museum, science centre and parks environment, specifically doing informal education.  I've had to spend time thinking about who is my audience and developing programs, exhibits and events targeted to the different audiences.  I've worn the expert hat and sometimes the challenge has been to remember that even though I'm a total science geek, most people aren't.  So that means people are likely not interested in the minutia the same way that I am.  They are often interested in broader topics and don't come equipped with the same level of knowledge that I have.  This doesn't mean that I think they aren't smart, it just means they have a life outside science.  Smiley

The most important thing to always remember is to find a way to make what you write relevant to your audience.  Make it something they can relate to their own life.

Julie
Craft Boutique


Posts: 177


« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2010, 01:41:37 am »

Julie, you are so right! Wow, I havenít thought of free tutorials in this way. I can see how other knitters would be attracted to them, but not the regular people, who donít know anything about knitting Ė and those are my buyers! Hmm, this makes things more challenging. Iíll have to think more about this now. Thanks for sharing your unique perspective!
Fairy Cardmaker


Posts: 1112


« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2010, 11:00:08 pm »

Quote
I've spent years working in the museum, science centre and parks environment, specifically doing informal education. I've had to spend time thinking about who is my audience and developing programs, exhibits and events targeted to the different audiences. I've worn the expert hat and sometimes the challenge has been to remember that even though I'm a total science geek, most people aren't. So that means people are likely not interested in the minutia the same way that I am.


Interesting.  Thanks for sharing!
LisaGold


Posts: 132


« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2010, 01:34:10 am »

As a regular person, who doesn't do any crafts, but has an appreciation for the handmade items, I'd want to read about your creative process, your thought process from inception to final design, learn what inspires you.
E.g.  where does your inspiration come from? When does it strike you? Is it mostly after work and dinner, when kids are in bed, or are you constantly thinking about new projects and doodling in your spare time?

Iíd even read about your daily life, if you have some good story to tell.  Itís always interesting to see how peopleís environment and upbringing affects them and shapes them into who they are... and I donít mean telling everyone that you had meatballs for dinner - thatís what Twitter is for ... ha ha Smiley No, it has to be something more profound, that connects you to your craft.
Fairy Cardmaker


Posts: 1112


« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2010, 08:15:12 pm »

Thanks for weighing in!

Quote
and I donít mean telling everyone that you had meatballs for dinner - thatís what Twitter is for ... ha ha


Heheheh.  Made me smile!
The Knitting Lady


Posts: 72


« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2010, 03:33:34 am »

I am not sure either what buyers would want to read about in the blog. That's a tough one.

I doubt buyers ever come to read articles or forum, or if they come, they come very rarely. I just can't see why they'd do that. All they are interested in is what's for sale, no? When you are in a shopping mode, you will not stop by and read an article.

I suppose this could work the other way - potential buyers somehow find article here that would lead them to your store and - bingo! They bought something from you. I think that's most likely how it works.
Fairy Cardmaker


Posts: 1112


« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2010, 06:30:57 pm »

I think it's the personal side of things.  Blogging helps a buyer get to "know" you: your style, your thought process, your likes and dislikes.  It may help them to feel more comfortable about your product and you and therefore more likely to buy from you.

I know a lot of people say the product should speak for itself but I think in a handcrafted world, part of the niftiness is knowing where the thing came from.

I also think that the part about "getting to know you" or feeling comfortable with who they are buying from is a function of the virtual realm.  There are bad things floating around in cyberspace.  If you walked in to a store and got a disreputable vibe, you'd probably walk right out.  It is harder to discern a "vibe" from a virtual venue.

These comments speak to this need - a human need to feel comfortable with your purchases by knowing something about the peddler... I mean... seller. :wink:

LisaGold:
Quote
I'd want to read about your creative process, your thought process from inception to final design, learn what inspires you.


Jewelry Without Borders said:
Quote
You can tell me some basic stuff about the materials you use (I'm interested in to know if it's wool, cotton, acrylic, etc.) and how to care for it. Maybe even tell me that x material is great for y application (so that I don't buy socks made from yarn that is really intended for something really delicate, just because I know nothing about yarns). If there is something special about some of the yarns you use - they are organic, or hand-dyed, or hypo-allergenic, or you raise your sheep yourself and hand spin your yarn, etc. - then tell me about it. It makes the material special. Maybe talk to me about how you make your products, how long it takes, show pictures of you at work on something, talk about your inspiration, etc.


Thanks for this discussion.  I think I'm started to get those wheels in my head clicking.
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